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Unsecured Database Threatens More Than 200M Records for Risk of Security Breach

March 27, 2020

Hikvision HikWire blog article 200M Records for Risk of Security Breach

Hikvision Tips to Educate Employees on Identifying Common Security Concerns

 

An unsecured database threatens more than 200M records for risk of security breach, according to the Security magazine article, “Unidentified Database Exposes Records of 200 Million Americans.”

Originally covered by CyberNews, its “research team uncovered an unsecured database owned by an unidentified party, comprising 800 gigabytes of personal user information. The database in question was left on a publicly accessible server and contained more than 200 million detailed user records, putting an astonishing number of people at risk.”

The database included U.S. user profiles, including information such as:

  • Full names, email addresses, and phone numbers
  • Dates of birth
  • Credit ratings
  • Detailed mortgage and tax records

The records also included detailed information about people’s investments, as well as political and charitable donations.

Click here to read more.

Hikvision provides tips to educate employees on identifying common security threats and concerns in this blog: “The Human Factor and Security Concerns with Cybersecurity and Security Breach.”

IMPORTANT! This model requires non-standard firmware. Do Not Install standard firmware (e.g. v.4.1.xx) on this model. Doing so will permanently damage your system. You must use custom firmware v.4.1.25 from the iDS-9632NXI-I8/16S product page.

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